Statist presumption

The common man is typically unnoticed in history, literature, and art. Reviewing James C. Scott’s book Against the Grain for the TLS, Crispin Sartwell writes:

If this picture is even roughly or partly true, mainline anthropology has been profoundly distorted by what we might call a statist presumption, by the equation, for example, of civilization with large-scale political authority. It lays open the question of who did the research, and for whom. The historical narrative, for many reasons, has been dominated by large states and empires that engaged, for example, in elaborate record-keeping and monumental architecture; what persists in time is inordinately the self-interpretation and self-presentation of political power.

TLS July 19 2019

Khomeini on Imperialism

In light of our current situation with Iran I decided to break out a book I have but have not read called Islam and Revolution, Writings and Declarations of Imam Khomeini. In the initial chapter—“Islamic Government”—Khomeini says that imperialists are not truly Christians, “…for the imperialists really have no religious belief, Christian or Islamic.” I can agree with him there. He then goes on to make an assertion that I think is highly suspect, and for which I doubt there is much evidence:

…throughout this long historical period, and going back to the Crusades, they [the imperialists] felt that the major obstacle in the path of their materialistic ambitions and the chief threat to their political power was nothing but Islam. They therefore plotted and campaigned against Islam by various means.

I don’t know who “they” are but this is a paranoid view on the face of it.