Stop the Spread of Islam in Africa

You can donate to the East Africa Revival Network here. A bit of background:

The East Africa Revival Network is an initiative to prevent the people of East Africa from falling behind an Islamic Curtain. And we need your help.

After World War II an Iron Curtain of Atheistic Communism fell over the peoples of Europe. Churches were closed, Christian leaders were imprisoned, practicing Christians were persecuted in innumerable ways and there could be no open proclamation of the Gospel. Two generations of young Europeans were effectively ‘lost’ to the Kingdom of God.

Islam is growing fast in Africa. Already more than 50% of the inhabitants of Africa are Muslim. It has been stated and echoed again and again by Muslim leaders that Africa will become the first “Islamic Continent”. They are very serious about this. The Iranians, Libyans, the Saudis,and many other members of the 57 nation Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC) are pouring many millions of dollars into African nations to build mosques, Islamic schools, clinics and to support a literal army of Islamic teachers and preachers. East Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, and the Eastern Congo) is a priority target for Islamic takeover because of it’s poverty and the ancient roots of Arab businessmen here Tanzania is alreaddy more than 30% Muslim, the tipping point for domination is about 40%.

At a Jerusalem Conference of church leaders Bishop Alexis Bilindabagabo was approached by two Tanzanian leaders who said, “You there in Eastern Rwanda still have revival. The churches in the path of the Islamic takeover in Tanzania are weak, worldly, or fractured. Can’t you come over and help us before the Muslims takeover? Otherwise Christians wll become a persecuted minority.”

Bishop Alexis had experienced cruel ethnic persecution in Rwanda and had been forced to be a refugee from his own country three times. He heard their cry and prayed. Then he invited these two Tanzanian leaders to the East Africa Revival Convention held in his Gahini Diocese each year and by faith announced God had raised up 18 laymen who were experience and committed evangelists to send to Tanzania to work with the churches there that are directly confronted by the Islamic Invasion. Out of this was born the Vision for an inter-denominational, international ministry of partners that would enlarge and accelerate the Mission to confront the Islamic Challenge with a revival of an evangelistic, missionary, church planting spirit.

The East Africa Revival Network

Rwanda is sending missionaries into Tanzania to combat the spread of Islam there. The East Africa Revival Network was created to facilitate this missionary effort. The background story is:

Islam is growing fast in Africa. Already more than 50% of the inhabitants of Africa are Muslim. It has been stated and echoed again and again by Muslim leaders that Africa will become the first “Islamic Continent”. They are very serious about this. The Iranians, Libyans, the Saudis,and many other members of the 57 nation Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC) are pouring many millions of dollars into African nations to build mosques, Islamic schools, clinics and to support a literal army of Islamic teachers and preachers. East Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, and the Eastern Congo) is a priority target for Islamic takeover because of it’s poverty and the ancient roots of Arab businessmen here Tanzania is alreaddy more than 30% Muslim, the tipping point for domination is about 40%.

At a Jerusalem Conference of church leaders Bishop Alexis Bilindabagabo was approached by two Tanzanian leaders who said, “You there in Eastern Rwanda still have revival. The churches in the path of the Islamic takeover in Tanzania are weak, worldly, or fractured. Can’t you come over and help us before the Muslims takeover? Otherwise Christians wll become a persecuted minority.”

Bishop Alexis had experienced cruel ethnic persecution in Rwanda and had been forced to be a refugee from his own country three times. He heard their cry and prayed. Then he invited these two Tanzanian leaders to the East Africa Revival Convention held in his Gahini Diocese each year and by faith announced God had raised up 18 laymen who were experience and committed evangelists to send to Tanzania to work with the churches there that are directly confronted by the Islamic Invasion. Out of this was born the Vision for an inter-denominational, international ministry of partners that would enlarge and accelerate the Mission to confront the Islamic Challenge with a revival of an evangelistic, missionary, church planting spirit.

Consider supporting this important effort in prayer and with money.

Money Can’t Buy Me Love

Thy silver is become dross – Isaiah 1:22

Yesterday, the Archbishop Murphy Indaba Association (formerly known as the AMiA) released financial records. I confess, I have not had time to dig into them yet, but I intend to when I am not reading old Kevin Donlon statements on Johanine Awakenings.

Someone calling himself “Theophorus” has been commenting here, on TitusOneNine, and Stand Firm, and painting a different picture from the air brushed portrait of the finances coming from the PI (Pawley’s Island for my non AMiA friends). Theophorus knows, or claims to know, a wealth of details. He is either a big fraud, or someone who really knows stuff. So, for your reading pleasure, I am consolidating his version of events in one place. Here it goes. Continue reading “Money Can’t Buy Me Love”

Donlon Dupes Rwanda?

I hope to read Canon Donlon’s response to the Washington Statement and interact with it in the next day or so. My first impression of it is underwhelming. Perhaps that is due to the buildup of the document by Father James Kennaugh who referred to it last week as “the document of record and correction.” At least it is something, compared to the emptiness of the three press releases from Rev. Brust. I don’t know if the Donlon document has the AMiA imprimatur on it, as we haven’t seen it officially referred to yet.

On a more interesting note, Robin Jordan has a scathing article about Donlon up at his blog. To Jordan’s credit, he has been tracking Donlon’s activities for some time now. Jordan passes along an assertion that Donlon pressured the Rwandan bishops to ratify his revisions to their canon laws under the pretext of urgency, an action that is a shameful way to treat a friend. From Jordan’s piece:

In these emails this individual stated that he was disturbed by the false impression of the doctrine and practice of the Anglican Church of Rwanda created by the new Rwandan canons adopted in September 2007. They did not reflect the Province’s longstanding Anglican doctrine and practice. He went on to state that the Rwandan House of Bishops was not given sufficient opportunity to examine the new canons or to make comments or suggest changes at the time the new canons were presented to them for endorsement and promulgation. The Rwandan Bishops were assured that Canon Kevin Donlan who had drafted the new canons was an expert in canon law. The endorsement and promulgation of the new canons was stressed as being urgent and not allowing for delay as it was essential for the legal changes that Anglican Mission needed to make in its charter.

What is becoming clear is that Donlon is pushing his vision of Eastern Rite Roman Catholic canon law as the basis for unifying GAFCON through intermediaries like Bishop Murphy, who probably don’t care what he does as long as it keeps the old ship AM sailing. Jordan continues:

My analysis of the Rwandan canons confirmed my earlier examination of the canons. They are heavily indebted to the Roman Catholic Church’s Code of Canon Law (1983). They replace Anglican teaching with Roman Catholic dogma as well as establish Roman Catholic governance structures.

As I wrote in my assessment of Canon 6, it attempts to recreate in the Anglican Church of Rwanda—at least in part—the papal system but on a smaller scale. The relationship of the Primate to the Primatial Vicar closely resembles that of the Roman Pontiff to a diocesan bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. Canon 6 recognizes the Primate as the supreme legislator for the Province as the Code of Canon Law (1983) recognizes the Roman Pontiff as the supreme legislator for the Roman Catholic Church. It further recognizes that legislative authority may be validly delegated to the Primatial Vicar as his deputy and agent.

So AMiA, which many of us thought was a a church planting movement rooted in Scripture and the classic formularies is now being turned into a strange amalgam of radical theology (women’s ordination, Jack Deere and Todd Hunter) and an inorganic attempt to impose unity on the emerging GAFCON bloc of Provinces via a foreign code of canon law. I will have more to say on this later, but I thank God that this has been brought to the light before it all was set in stone.

Note also that there is no concern for unity with ACNA in anything that Donlon and Bishop Murphy have done. Our Lord’s desire for unity, expressed in John 17, is hard enough to achieve given our many differences of theology and practice. What we are seeing from theAM is an attempt to move further and further away from ACNA. My contention from the beginning of ACNA has been that it is a very imperfect body, but that it is the body that now exists. The time for CANA and AMiA is over. Bishop Minns and Bishop Murphy should move on, and their organizations should fold into ACNA. Canon Donlon’s machinations drive a stake through any hope that AMiA will ever join ACNA under the leadership of Bishop Murphy.

Bishop Murphy and the Rwandan House of Bishops

Unlike the fellows at Anglican TV, I am not a journalist. I do not have multiple sources and fact checks for the account below. Take it with a grain of salt and know that it could be wrong, misleading, or third hand and inaccurate information. Someone left it as a comment on my earlier post called “AMiA: the Plot Thickens.” It has at least the ring of truth to it, in that it recounts details that your average outsider would not know. So here is an edited version of the comment:

I can’t say how I know, but I can tell you that Bishop Murphy as downright disingenuous in his description of the June HOB [House of Bishops] in Rwanda. The entire house of Bishops objected to his bringing along Kevin Donlon and H Miller to [the] HOB meeting. They did not want to be lectured to, they wanted answers which the good Bishop and the former Abp. [editor – I believe he means Kolini] refused to give relating to a simple transparent accounting of monies supposedly given to Rwanda. No one, to this day, knows where more than 1 million dollars went over the course of 4 years. No one even knows what or whose bank account this money went to!
When the Bishops saw that they were not ever going to get an answer then they simply asked for proper procedures to be followed in the future. They also stated that the house of bishops would no longer be a rubber stamp for the Abp. when it came to the oversight of missionary districts, bishops, etc. At this Bishop Murphy stormed out of the meeting refusing to even take lunch with the Bishops.
Bishop Murphy is also attempting to deceive everyone with his talk, through Miss Brust, about ‘ongoing talks with Rwandan leadership’. He is only talking to Kolini and Rwaje. Bishop John [editor – I think he means Bishop John Rucyahana] wrote to Chuck Murphy begging him not to take this step. I know for a fact that none of the Bishops of Rwanda knew anything about this ‘new arrangement’. But, they all did know Chuck Murphy well enough to suspect that if they asked for financial transparency and proper oversight that the Bishop of Pawley’s Island would take his marbles and go home. The unknown is which circle he would go to to play marbles in next. Everyone knew he would not go to the ACNA. Now it seems he has co-opted the missionary vision of a good man and is twisting it to his own agenda. Isn’t it time for some AMiA people to suggest that Chuck retire and ask for a ‘real’ meeting with the Rwanda HOB?

[end of comment]

So there you have it. Perhaps a glimpse behind the curtain of what is really going on at Pawley’s. Perhaps it is worth noting here the charge to new Bishops from the 1928 BCP:

…be, to such as believe, a wholesome example in word, in conversation, in love, in faith, in chastity, and in purity;”

I hope that nothing is amiss with the finances, as nothing will more quickly bring the aspersion of the world and the discouragement of the Church than for there to be financial scandal in the Church.

The Archbishop Weighs In

In the past few hours, a statement from Archbishop Rwaje and Bishop Murphy was issued, saying in part:

We have recently been made aware that a number of unfounded rumors and false assertions regarding the relationship between the Anglican Mission and Rwanda have begun to swirl in various circles and on the Internet. We are releasing this statement together to urge you not to be misled or distracted by those who would sow destructive seeds of discord through innuendo and commentary, for we know that this is the work and design of the Enemy.

This vague statement doesn’t really answer much of anything. What are the “unfounded rumors”? What are the “false assertions”? Three clergy in good standing have issued a statement of fact, yet to be countered in any meaningful way, in order to foster a discussion. That is what grownups do, they discuss things and have a conversation. This latest attempt to shut down the conversation with an “all is well” press release doesn’t answer any questions. So rather than generalities about “innuendo and commentary,” let’s hope there is a charitable and public discussion going forward.

One possible side affect of the Washington Statement is that it will derail whatever Bishop Murphy had in mind in terms of a College of Consultors. Ultimately, there is no reason for AMiA, CANA or the REC to exist any more. They should all disband and fold into ACNA. Why continue to maintain separate staff, offices and work at cross purposes? Why not shelve these groups before further hardening happens and divisions become permanent? Keeping AMiA apart from ACNA is indeed inviting discord.

A Missionary Jurisdiction of Rwanda?

The AMiA document “A Canonical Charter for Ministry Of the Anglican Mission in the Americas” says, “The Anglican Mission is a Missionary Jurisdiction of the Anglican Province of Rwanda…” (Article 1). Bishop Chuck Murphy has written that, “The Anglican Mission Charter states that the Anglican Mission remains as a missionary outreach of the Province of Rwanda, and in addition, the Mission is embedded in the Constitution and Canons of the Province of Rwanda.”

And yet, the Washington Statement issued by three AMiA clergy says:

In 2007, Kevin Donlon wrote new canons for the Province of Rwanda, which were then approved by the Province. The canons do not mention the AMiA, but they do make provision for organizations such as the AMiA to become “missionary jurisdictions” of the province through petitioning the House of Bishops.The AMiA has yet to make such a petition. Consequently, the AMiA’s Canonical Charter for Ministry (9/2009) wrongly identifies the Anglican Mission as a missionary jurisdiction. Further, it is incorrect to say, as Bp Murphy has often said, that the AMiA “is embedded in the Constitution and Canons of the Province of Rwanda.”In truth, the AMiA exists as a “Personal Prelature,” i.e. a  personal ministry initiative of a bishop, in this case, Abp Kolini until his retirement, and  now Abp Rwaje, who will serve for another 6 years.

The question should be put to the leadership of AMiA: why this discrepancy? Why hasn’t AMiA made such a petition? And wasn’t this one of the driving reasons behind the move away from ACNA last year?