Thank you to Leonard’s Books

I had a couple fairly cheap Bibles that were in bad shape. Neither were terribly old, and both text blocks were in pretty good condition, but the covers were in shambles and one was disintegrating. The first was a Crossway ESV Thinline Edition that I purchased in 2005 and carried around for a few years. The text was fine but the cover was scratched, falling apart and in poor shape. The second Bible was a New American Standard Ultra Thin Reference Edition published by Broadman & Holman that I bought my wife in 1997. It was basically unusable due to falling apart. Although the text block was OK, maps were falling out and endpapers were not in good shape.

I decided to send both of these Bibles to Leonard’s Books after reading such glowing reviews of their work and seeing pictures of it too. Today, our Bibles came back in the mail, and Leonard’s did delightful work! Here are some “after” pictures though, and I hope they show you how Leonard’s took some average, cheap Bibles that did not last very long at all and turned them into really solid books that should last for many, many decades to come. Thanks Leonard’s!

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The ESV Thinline
The NAS before the rebind
The NAS was in bad shape!
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The NAS
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Both Bibles showing the yap and ribbons, which are original
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How the NAS opens
Both texts open, NAS on top, ESV on the bottom
Both texts open, NAS on top, ESV on the bottom
For comparison, the Leonard's rebinds on the bottom with the ESV Reader's edition from Crossway, and the ESV Clarion Reference edition from Cambridge
For comparison, the Leonard’s rebinds on the bottom with the ESV Reader’s edition from Crossway, and the ESV Clarion Reference edition from Cambridge

5 thoughts on “Thank you to Leonard’s Books”

  1. Thank you for the reference. Only one Bible, I would care enough to spend the money, as in economically a replacement is fine. However, there are those times, as when the beloved new puppy chewed up the cover of great grandmother algebra book, the one that she taught out of on the frontier, that one need to find a good book binder/restoration shop.

    1. How do you dispose of an old Bible? I don’t like the thought of it, so to me it is worth it to bring these back into good shape.

      1. I personally am fine with having the paper recycled [I’ve not and don’t think I would put one in the trash — the sad truth is that they tend to kick around my house, as with old T-shirt which are too small or have holes in them]. I can understand wanting to treat the Word of God with respect, the RCC rubric of blessed things is into the ground or into a body. While you may not want to take on all the RCC impregnates into their understanding of relics, blesses items and the like, still retaining the respect and dignity, such as disposal of an unsolvable US Flag [there oddly by US Code Title 4 Chapter 1 Sec. 8 k, yes “should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning” — the thing you learn are true on the Internet when answering another question]. The LORD obviously was more offended by a sinner, Uza, touching His ark than for it to hit the ground — Dig a hole and bury it, we are from the Earth and for earth we shall return.

        1. Rabbit Trail — but there is a wonderful example of where an action is not so much right or wrong but the heart. So in 1989 Supreme Court case Texas v. Gregory Lee Johnson was about burning a flag, yet the US Code actually gives preference to disposal by burning, therefore what actually mattered is the heart, whether in protest or disrespect verse dignified. I think the same could hold true here too.

        2. Obviously we cannot preserve every old Bible when the printing presses churn them out at such massive volume. However, I want to do my best to take care of the copies I have , and I find it particularly galling to see a ten year old copy falling apart.
          I agree with you that it is a matter of conscience ultimately.

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