Father Kevin Donlon and Plagiarism II

After a bit of what seems to be original content, Donlon returns to taking text directly from the Informative Dossier:

Donlon

Informative Dossier

In ancient times and in the Middle Ages, to make good for the lack of manual copies, the system of “tablets” was used; on these ” tablets ” the truths of the and the prayers were inscribed and were put in a place in the house or Church where they could be easily seen, so that everybody could understand their content. In other times, they were “illustrated catechisms” which served not only the illiterate but also the whole community as didactic aids. The entirety of this journey formed a deep and abiding Christian mythic consciousness. However, once the RCIA fell into disuse this mythic consciousness was very difficult to recapture. In ancient times and in the Middle Ages, to make good for the lack of manual copies, the system of “tablets” was used; on these “tablets” the truths of the faith and the prayers were inscribed and were put in a place in the house or Church where they could be easily seen, so that everybody could understand their content. In other times, they were “illustrated catechisms” which served not only the illiterate but also the whole community as didactic aids.
By the Fifth Century, St Augustine of Hippo at the request of a catechist, writes Twenty Seven chapters in which he tries to help deepen the faith of those Christians who, though educated in profane knowledge, were “rude” in the religious one. In the beginning of the V Century, an exceptional author, St Augustine, on the request of a catechist, writes 27 chapters in which he tries to help deepen the faith of those Christians who, though educated in profane knowledge, were “rude” in the religious one.
This work is entitled De Catechizandis Rudibus. He begins with the history of salvation which culminates in the charity brought by Jesus Christ, who through his Resurrection gives joy to the catechist and the one being catechized. Thus he entitles his work De catechizandis rudibus(5). He begins with the history of salvation which culminates in the charity brought by Jesus Christ, who through his Resurrection gives joy to the catechist and the one being catechized.
In the Ninth century, Alcuin of York, the great promoter of the cultural Renaissance during the time of Charles the Great, is attributed the redaction of Disputatio Puerorum Per Interrogationes et Responsiones (an exposition for children in questions and answers). It includes sacred history and the doctrine on the Sacraments, the Creed and the Our Father. The title indicates already its method and is a forerunner of modern catechisms as the vernacular language was used for the catechesis. In the IX century, Alcuino, the great promoter of the cultural Renaissance during the time of Charles the Great, is attributed the redaction of Disputatio puerorum per interrogationes et responsiones (an exposition for children in questions and answers). It includes sacred history and the doctrine on the Sacraments, the Creed and the Our Father. The title indicates already its method and is a forerunner of modern catechisms. It was widely used until the XII century. The vernacular language was used for the catechesis of this period.

Donlon appears to make a copy / paste error in the next selection, which mangles the Catholic text to read “In the York…”:

In the York there was used published what was known as a Lay Folks Catechism, which included the Creed, the Sacraments, the two precepts of charity, the seven capital sins and the seven cardinal virtues. For the first time the name Catechism was explicitly used. It was published in two languages, Latin and English, for popular use. Already several other times catechetical works were written in the vernacular language for those people who did not normally use Latin. the vernacular language for those people who did not normally use Latin. In the XIV Century (1357), the Archbishop of York published the “Lay Folks Catechism” which included the Creed, the Sacraments, the two precepts of charity, the seven capital sins and the seven fundamental virtues. For the first time the name Catechism was explicitly used. It was published in two languages, Latin and English, for popular use. Already several other times catechetical works were written, in the vernacular language for those people who did not normally use Latin.
On the eve the Reformation, Martin Luther, in 1529, using the material of his catechetical sermons wrote his first catechism as a guide to those who would preach and teach the goals of his reform of his reforms. This was followed by one he authored for “children and simple people”, which he even called Enchiridion. Martin Luther, in 1529, using the material of his catechetical sermons wrote his Catechismus Maior, as a guide to the preachers of his reform. Later he wrote another one for “children and simple people”, which he even called Enchiridion. 

A bit more creativity is shown with this borrowing:

There were also other reformers, such as John Calvin, who made use of this genre to teach people their new doctrines and whose influence would be felt catechetically. When the Reformation dust settled, most reformation traditions had some example of a catechism, as did the Roman Catholic Church in response. Irrespective of where one found one’s self on the theological fault line, few could dispute the efficacy of these “books in the effective dispensation of religious information/propaganda at all levels. Also other reformers, among whom Calvin, made use of this genre to teach people their new doctrines. The efficacy of this “book” had already been proved and thus all employed this indispensable aid for the religious formation at all levels.

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