Father Kevin Donlon and Plagiarism I

Last year during the heat of the AMiA meltdown, I was reading through a paper by AMiA Canonist Kevin Donlon entitled “Catechisms: More than Remembering.” You can find the paper here. Another paper I referred to was pulled from the site, this one wasn’t. I had occasion to re-read the paper last night, and I was quickly able to find some glaring cases of borrowing in it.
The first few paragraphs of the paper are lifted wholesale from a Vatican document called “Informative Dossier” by the Editorial Commission of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Some of the phrases are cobbled together in different places, but they are still there. Judge for yourself:

Donlon Informative Dossier
a word which the ancient Greeks used in reference to the theatre and which means “to make resound like an echo”. This word, which does not appear in the Old Testament a word which the ancient Greeks used in reference to the theatre and which means “to make resound like an echo”(1). This word, which does not appear neither in the Old Testament
as there is some usage of the Greek word “didaché” which is given the meaning of “transmitting the Word of God as a teaching of life”. In the Old Testament the word “didaché” – teaching – is found. It is given the meaning of transmission of the Word of God as a teaching of life.
Thus, in Deuteronomy 4:10 (“Gather the people to me, that I may let them hear my words so that they may learn to fear me all the days that they live upon the earth, and that they may teach their children so” and in Deuteronomy 11:19-20: “And you shell teach them to your children, talking of them… And you shall write them upon the doorposts of your house”.) Thus, in Deut 4:10 we read: “Gather the people to me, that I may let them hear my words so that they may learn to fear me all the days that they live upon the earth, and that they may teach their children so”. And in Deut 11:19-20: “And you shall teach them to your children, talking of them… And you shall write them upon the doorposts of your house”.
In the New Testament Gospels one could argue that the Gospels are the first great “Catechism” which was transmitted orally and eventually put to writing containing the essentials of all that Jesus “teaches” and “preaches” (Matthew 9:35; Mark 1:21; Luke 21:37). In the New Testament, the Gospels are the first great “Catechism” which was transmitted orally and then put to writing. Jesus “teaches” and “preaches” (Matt 9:35; Mark 1:21; Luke 21:37). The Sermon of the Mount (Matt 5,2) speaks of the “teaching to the disciples”.
taken up by the nascent Church to indicate the primordial duty to make disciples (cf. Acts of the Apostles and the Pauline Letters). taken up by the nascent Church to indicate the primordial duty to make disciples (cf. Acts of the Apostles and the Pauline Letters).
The proclamation of salvation was to be consolidated into the words and deeds of Christ, so as to provoke an “echo” in the mind and in the heart of the listeners, and transform their lives. The proclamation of salvation was to be consolidated, the deeds and the work had to provoke an “echo” in the mind and in the heart of the listeners, to transform all their life.
by the end of the first century, the “Didaché” or “Doctrine of the Apostles” was compiled. It was a guide to instruct those who were preparing to be baptized as well as to inform about the nature of the life in the community. In Syria, at the end of the first century, the “Didaché” or “Doctrine of the Apostles” was compiled. It was a guide to instruct those who were preparing to be baptised as well as to dispose all the life of the community…
fundamental Christian truths, formulated in a clear way so that understanding, apprehension and application could be appropriated. fundamental Christian truths, formulated in a clear way so that their understanding, apprehension and lively reception are made easier.
As time went by, became the normal aid for this duty was called Catechism. as time went by, became the normal aid for this duty was called Catechism.

This failure of attribution is noticeable in Donlon’s footnotes, which make no mention of the Vatican document, but say:

1 Stuart G. Hall., Doctrine and Practice in the Early Church.,(Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmanns Publishing Co.,1991)p.29-31
2 William Harmless., Augustine and the Catechumenate., (Collegeville: The Liturgical Press/Pueblo Books,1995) p.24-25
3 Joseph Christopher., (trans,) St. Augustine The First Catechetical Instruction., (New York :Newman Press, 1966)
4 T.F. Simmons and H.E. Nolloth (ed) The Lay Folks Catechism or The English anl Latin Versions of Archbistop Thoresby’s Instruction for the People, (London : The Early English Texts Society, 1901) Series N. No. 118
5 B.Lohse.,, Martin Luther: An Introduction to His Life and Writings., (Philadelphia: Fortress Books, 1986)
6 Ian Green., The Christian’s ABC., p.93-94
7 Ibid., p.66
8 Alexander Nowell, A Catechism ( Cambridge: The Parker Society Series, 1840) p.143
9 Edward Cardwell., Canons of 1604 (London : Synodalia, 1842) vol. 1, p.281

This is a serious breach of academic integrity and bears further investigation.
UPDATE: The original post mentioned a paper pulled from the Global South website. That is a different paper, and I will look into it as time allows.

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